School of Psychology - Leading psychological science, scholarship and practice


Postgraduate courses

Thinking about postgraduate study? Explore your postgraduate course options in the School of Psychology for 2017

  1. » PSYCH 700: Political Psychology
  2. » PSYCH 707: Forensic Psychology
  3. » PSYCH 708 A & B: Clinical Neuropsychology
  4. » PSYCH 711 A & B: Advanced Topics in Learning and Behaviour
  5. » PSYCH 714: Cognitive Neuroscience
  6. » PSYCH 715: Applying Psychology to Sustainability
  7. » PSYCH 716: Social Psychology and Interpersonal Processes
  8. » PSYCH 717: Community Psychology
  9. » PSYCH 718: Psychotherapeutic Assessment and Formulation
  10. » PSYCH 720: Research Topic in Psychology
  11. » PSYCH 721: Consciousness and Cognition
  12. » PSYCH 722: Learning and Human Development
  13. » PSYCH 723: Mental Health Problems: Aetiology and Assessment
  14. » PSYCH 724: Perceptual Neuroscience
  15. » PSYCH 725: Evolutionary Psychology
  16. » PSYCH 726: Emotion and Identity: Social
  17. » PSYCH 727: Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  18. » PSYCH 730: Professional Psychology Practice In New Zealand
  19. » PSYCH 731: Social Psychology and Intergroup Processes
  20. » PSYCH 740: Sensory Science
  21. » PSYCH 742: The Neuroscience of Awareness
  22. » PSYCH 743: Critical Qualitative Research
  23. » PSYCH 744: Experimental Design and Quantitative Methods for Psychology
  24. » PSYCH 733 Critical Health Psychology
  25. » PSYCH 746: Perception, Cognition and Action
  26. » PSYCH 750 A & B: Applied Behaviour Analysis: Methods
  27. » PSYCH 751 A & B: Applied Behaviour Analysis: Behaviour Modification
  28. » PSYCH 754: Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities
  29. » PSYCH 755: Gender, Power and Sexuality
  30. » PSYCH 757: Advanced Applied Behaviour Analysis
  31. » PSYCH 788 A & B: Honours Dissertation in Psychology
  32. » PSYCH 796 A & B: Masters Thesis in Psychology
  33. » Further information

PSYCH 700: Political Psychology


(15 points), S1


Staff:
Dr Danny Osborne

This seminar-based course will provide an overview of the burgeoning field of political psychology. Students will be exposed to a rich interdisciplinary research area that seeks to understand how psychological phenomena shape—and are shaped by—the world of politics. Ultimately, students will achieve a nuanced understanding of the intersecting fields of psychology and political science, while also being exposed to a variety of methodologies used to study this exciting area of research. The topics addressed may include (a) personality and politics, (b) political socialization, (c) the effects of the media on socio-political attitudes, (d) voting behaviour, (e) the competency of the electorate, (f) the debate between rational choice
and symbolic politics, (g) system justification theory and (h) other timely issues. Attention will be paid to the international literature, although New Zealand-based research will also be discussed.

Coursework: 30%
Class presentation: 20%
Research proposal: 50%

There is a limit of 16 places on this course.

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PSYCH 707: Forensic Psychology


(15 points), S1

Staff: Associate Professor Ian Lambie

This course focuses on research, theory and practice of psychology applied to the analysis, prevention, assessment, and treatment of criminal behaviour. Emphasis will be placed on a developmental perspective both adolescent and adult offending, with particular emphasis on violent and sexual offenders. In addition to the course being based on applied research, it will focus on three key principles - risk, needs and responsivity. Participants will develop an understanding of key developments in correctional and forensic psychology in New Zealand.

Coursework: 50%: Literature review 25%, Group presentation 12.5%, essay 12.5%
Two-three field trip visits to forensic settings in the Auckland region (please be aware lecture times might vary in order to accommodate these field trips. Times are organised at the beginning of semester. Attendance at field visits is voluntary.
Final Exam: 50%

Prescribed Text: Andrews, D.A., & Bonta, J. (2010). The Psychology of criminal conduct (54th ed.). Cincinnati, OH: Anderson Publishing Co.

Selection Priority

  1. Students selected for the Psychology Honours programme specialising in Clinical Psychology.
  2. Students enrolled in any other year of the clinical psychology programme who wish to take this course.
  3. Students who are or will be enrolling in a Masters thesis or PhD in an area related to PSYCH 707 with clinical psychology staff.
  4. Any remaining places will be filled according to the students’ average GPA on their best four Stage III Psychology courses, including PSYCH 306.

There is a limit of 18 places in this course.

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PSYCH 708 A & B: Clinical Neuropsychology


(30 points),  S1 & 2

Staff: Associate Professor Lynette Tippett (Coordinator), Associate Professor Suzanne Barker-Collo, Clinical Associate in Neurosurgery: Mr Edward Mee.

The course aims to provide students with an understanding of the following:

  1. Neuroanatomy, neuropathology, and neurosurgical and neurological approaches to treatment.
  2. Neuropsychological techniques and procedures used to investigate the relation between the brain and behaviour.
  3. The methodological and theoretical issues involved.
  4. Interpretation and analysis of data from individual patients.
  5. A knowledge of some of the major areas of neuropsychological dysfunction (eg, aphasia, amnesia, spatial disorders, apraxia, agnosia, callosal syndromes, dementia, head injury, rehabilitation).

A basic knowledge of human neuroanatomy, human experimental psychology and psychometrics is assumed. Students are also advised to complete the required texts at least before the end of the first semester, and to read current issues of the relevant journals. Weekly two-hour seminars will be held. The course is divided into three parts.

  • Part 1: Introduction to neuroanatomy and neuropathology with a short test on this area. General methodology, test materials and theoretical issues of neuropsychological assessment.
  • Part 2: Staff and student seminars on major topics in neuropsychology. Each student will be expected to present to the class a seminar on a selected topic in neuropsychology, and write an essay.
  • Part 3: Analysis and interpretation of individual data. Five paper case studies will be dealt with. Each student will write up the studies before the seminar at which the case is discussed.

Selection priority:
As per PSYCH 707 Selection priority.

Coursework: 70% Five written paper case studies (7% each), one written essay presented as a seminar (20%), one written test on neuroanatomy and neuropathology (10%), two neuropsychological assessments (5% in total)
Final Exam: 30%

Prescribed texts: Lezak, M.D. Neuropsychological Assessment, OUP, 3rd edn, 1994, or 4th edition, 2004; Ogden, J.A. Fractured Minds, A Case Study Approach to Clinical Neuropsychology, 2nd edition OUP, 2005.
Recommended texts: Goldberg, S. Clinical Neuroanatomy made Ridiculously Simple, MedMaster Inc., 1979. Heilman, K.M., and Valenstein, E. Clinical Neuropsychology, OUP, 3rd ed, 1994. Walsh, K.W., Neuropsychology: A Clinical Approach, 3rd ed, Churchill Livingston, 1994. Luria, A.R., The Working Brain, Harmondsworth, Basic Books, 1973.

There is a limit of 14 places in this course.

The Dorothy Gronwall Memorial Prize in Clinical Neuropsychology

This prize was established in 2003 in honour and memory of Dr Dorothy Gronwall (1931-2001), who completed her PhD in our school. She was the first practicing clinical neuropsychologist in New Zealand and an internationally renowned research scientist in the area of neuropsychological consequences of traumatic brain injury. Dr Gronwall established the Clinical Neuropsychology postgraduate paper. The prize of $1000 is awarded annually to the student who obtains the highest marks in PSYCH708 within the A range, and enrols in either a PhD or a Doctor of Clinical Psychology, with a thesis in an area of neuropsychology.

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PSYCH 711 A & B: Advanced Topics in Learning and Behaviour


(30 points), S1 & 2

Staff: Associate Professor Douglas Elliffe, Dr Sarah Cowie

To complete this course students must enrol in PSYCH 711 A and B

This is a seminar course on advanced treatments of learning including both reinforcement and stimulus control. A research-oriented approach is stressed in pure, applied, and theoretical areas and in the technological application of basic principles in commercial, educational and clinical procedures. Specific topics will be decided in consultation at the beginning of the course.

Coursework: 50% 10% from questions/comments on assigned readings + attendance; 40% essays (4 essays x 10%)
Final Exam: 50%

Recommended Reading
: Original papers will be cited.

There is a limit of 20 places in this course.

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PSYCH 714: Cognitive Neuroscience


(15 points), S1

Staff: Professor Ian Kirk

An advanced seminar on cognitive neuroscience, brain organisation and function. Emphasis will be placed on the most current cognitive neuroscience research examining both normal cognition and how cognitive processes break down in aging and/or disease. Students will also achieve an advanced level of understanding of gross human neuroanatomy and neuroimaging techniques. Topics may include neuroimaging techniques such as fMRI, ERP, EEG and structural imaging; episodic, spatial and temporal memory processes; the role of long-term potentiation in memory formation; the neural substrates of cerebral specialization; the neural bases of ADHD, aging, Alzheimer’s disease, depression, dyslexia and schizophrenia.

Recommended: PSYCH 202 and PSYCH 305* or consent of instructor.
Coursework: 60%
Final exam: 40%

There is a limit of 16 places in this course. 

*Note: PSYCH 305 is recommended but is not a prerequisite. However, considerable background knowledge is assumed, and students who have not taken PSYCH 305 (or 570.303) are strongly advised to discuss this with the instructors before enrolling in this seminar course.

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PSYCH 715: Applying Psychology to Sustainability


(15 Points), S1

Staff: Associate Professor Niki Harré (Coordinator)

What would a sustainable society look like? How can psychology help us get there? These are the questions at the centre of this course. The first half of the course will consist of lectures, discussions and readings on a) the psychological barriers to thinking and acting sustainably, and b) how research on emotions, modeling, identity, belonging, moral development and the evolution of cooperation can be applied to overcome these barriers. Students will post critical reflections on the material covered and how it applies to their lives, communities, and/or wider cultural and political processes. The second half of the course will involve students proposing a strategy or intervention to encourage sustainable practices within an organisation or community they are familiar with. Students will need to use some of the psychological principles covered in the course as well as principles from other areas in psychology, or experience in the “real world” (eg, in the workplace, as a political agent, in a community group). Each student will then showcase their proposal in a presentation.

Coursework: 20% Critical reflections, 30% test, 10% Presentation, 40% Proposal report.

There is a limit of 20 places on this course.

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PSYCH 716: Social Psychology and Interpersonal Processes


(15 points), S1

Staff: Associate-Professor Nickola Overall

The course is seminar-based and focuses on applying contemporary theory and research to understanding how the social environment shapes who we are and how we behave within interpersonal contexts. The course is organized around three progressing themes: (1) a foundational perspective illustrating the importance of social connections for people’s health and wellbeing, (2) exploring how prior interpersonal experiences influence the way individuals’ think, feel and behave, and (3) examining how people attempt to manage their relationships with others. Topics include, for example, the physiological and psychological consequences of social isolation vs. support, social emotions, social cognition and attribution, attachment processes, self-esteem and dependence regulation, stereotype threat, interpersonal communication and influence, self-regulation, impression management, and relationship maintenance.

Coursework: 70% (essay and research project with associated seminar presentations, class participation).
Final exam: 30%

There is a limit of 16 places in this course.

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PSYCH 717: Community Psychology


(15 points), S2

Staff: Dr Shiloh Groot

This course provides an introduction to global community psychology and explores different applications of the approach in different parts of the world including South Africa, South America, Australia and New Zealand. We will also look at the synergies between community psychology and Indigenous psychologies. The first part will critically examine the theoretical assumptions and goals of community psychology. In the second part of the course, students will identify a social issue and the types of responses psychologists often engage in and consider alternatives to address this issue. Students will give a conference-style presentation on their social issue and responses.

Restriction: 461.728

Coursework: 55%

Final Exam: 45%

There is a limit of 16 places in this course.

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PSYCH 718: Psychotherapeutic Assessment and Formulation


(15 points), S2

Staff: Dr Claire Cartwright

Attention will be given to the major theories used in clinical practice to understand psychological problems, including behavioural, cognitive behavioural, systems and psychodynamic models. The emphasis is on assessment and formulation of clients’ problems rather than therapeutic intervention. In addition to understanding how these theories inform the psychologist’s activities, the influence of gender, age, and culture on the assessment process are considered.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 723
Restriction: PSYCH 709
Coursework: 50%
Final Exam: 50%

Selection priority for PSYCH 718:

  1. Students selected for the Psychology Honours programme specialising in Clinical Psychology.
  2. Students enrolled in any other year of the clinical psychology programme who wish to take this course.
  3. Students who are or will be enrolling in a Masters thesis or PhD in an area related to PSYCH 718 with clinical psychology staff.
  4. Any remaining places will be filled according to the students’ average GPA on their best four Stage III psychology courses.

There is a limit of 16 places in this course.

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PSYCH 720: Research Topic in Psychology


(30 points)

Staff: Associate Professor Paul Corballis

A research topic undertaken under the supervision of a staff member and written up for presentation instead of a final course. Students intending to enrol in this course should consult the topics available and the staff research interests on the Psychology website, and select a topic in consultation with a staff member. A note from the staff member indicating the staff member’s agreement to supervise the topic should be obtained by the student and submitted with the school's enrolment form. Students should complete the bulk of empirical work by mid-year, submit a draft to the supervisor. The final report must be typed and should follow APA journal format. Assessment for this course is 100% coursework. This is made up of 80% for the written research report, and 20% for the practical component, based on a report from the project supervisor.

Closing date for submission of research topic reports: Mid October - date TBA.

Note: Please look through staff research interests and approach academic staff to discuss possible research options.

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PSYCH 721: Consciousness and Cognition


(15 points), S2

Staff: Associate Professor Tony Lambert

This seminar based course will consider consciousness from the perspective of cognitive neuroscience. Topics discussed vary from year to year, but have previously included: perception without awareness, blindsight, agnosia, implicit learning and memory, amnesia, attention, hemineglect, the split-brain syndrome, schizophrenia, dreams, philosophical issues, and synaesthesia.

Restriction: 461.724
Coursework: 50%: seminar presentation,10% research critique 15% essay 25%
Final Exam: 50%

There is a limit of 16 places in this course.

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PSYCH 722: Learning and Human Development


(15 points), S1

Staff: Dr Liz Peterson

This course will focus on the processes and factors that influence human learning from early childhood through to early adulthood. Topics discussed may include: early social cognition, language development, and the factors that influence school and life success. Consideration will be given to diverse contexts and populations. It is strongly recommended that students enrolled in this course have taken PSYCH 326 (or equivalent).

Coursework: 60%

Final Exam: 40%

There is a limit of 16 places in this course.

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PSYCH 723: Mental Health Problems: Aetiology and Assessment


(15 points), S1

Staff: Associate Professor Kerry Gibson

Provides an overview of common mental health problems in childhood and adulthood and the methods that clinical psychologists use to assess these. It will examine theories of causation and risk factors for a number of mental health problems. It will also introduce and critique diagnostic tools and psychometric instruments used in assessment.

Coursework: 50%
Final Exam: 50%

There is a limit of 16 places in this course.

Selection priority for PSYCH 723:

  1. Students selected for the Psychology Honours programme specialising in Clinical Psychology.
  2. Students enrolled in any other year of the clinical psychology programme who wish to take this course.
  3. Students who are or will be enrolling in a Masters thesis or PhD in an area related to PSYCH 718 with clinical psychology staff.
  4. Any remaining places will be filled according to the students’ average GPA on their best four Stage III psychology courses.
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PSYCH 724: Perceptual Neuroscience


(15 points), S2

Staff: Professor Will Hayward.  Others contributing to the course: Professor Steven Dakin, Dr Misha Vorobyev, Dr Nicola Anstice, Dr Joanna Black, Associate Professor Paul Corballis, Dr Grant Searchfield, Dr Geraint Phillips

This is a team-taught course by a set of instructors, mainly from the School of Psychology and the Department of Optometry. The course is focused on how the brain processes sensory information in order to provide the basis for other psychological attributes. We will cover vision (e.g., motion, colour, development, identification, attention), audition, taste, somatosensory processing, and neurodevelopmental disorders. Classes will be seminars, based on journal articles, and led by both instructors and students. The course will provide a strong foundation in the brain basis for sensation, which will be particularly useful background for research projects in cognitive neuroscience.

Class:  1 two-hour seminar per week

Coursework: TBA

Exam: TBA

There is a limit of 16 places in this course.

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PSYCH 725: Evolutionary Psychology


(15 points), S1

Staff: Dr Alex Taylor and Dr Quentin Atkinson

This course examines human psychology from an evolutionary perspective. It focuses on two key questions: What makes human cognition so different from that of other animals? Why does intelligence evolve at all? Specific topics may include causal reasoning, cooperation, theory of mind, mental time travel, consciousness, cognitive archaeology and religion.

Coursework: 50% (details to be advised)
Final Exam: 50%

There is a limit of 16 places in this course.

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PSYCH 726: Emotion and Identity: Social


(15 Points), S2

Staff: Professor Margaret Wetherell

Emotions are central to social life such as the flash of rage which sweeps through a crowd on the verge of rioting, the affective patterns that develop in a personal relationship, or which distinguish a work-place, a community or a way of life. Emotion is linked to identity, memory, interaction, bodies and brains, personal history and social history, and requires a wide canvas from psychobiology to social theory. This course examines current understandings of emotion in psychology and the social sciences and explores new social psychological thinking concerning ‘affective meaning-making’ and ‘affective practices’. Students will be given the opportunity to collect their own examples of emotion in public life and develop analyses of these as part of the coursework.

Coursework: TBA
Exam: TBA

Set Text: M. Wetherell (2011) Affect and Emotion: A New Social Science Understanding. London: Sage.

There is a limit of 16 places in this course. 

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PSYCH 727: Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging


(15 points) S1

Staff: Professor Donna-Rose Addis

There is a limit of 20 places in this course

This course provides an in-depth overview of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a particular focus on its use in the cognitive neuroscience of memory and aging. The course is designed for beginners, and will provide comprehensive coverage of experimental design, image acquisition, image pre-processing, analysis methods (ranging from univariate GLM approaches to multivariate and connectivity approaches), localisation and interpretation. Basic coverage of functional neuroanatomy will also be provided. Classes will involve a lecture and/or a student-led seminar followed by a hands-on laboratory working with fMRI data (with assistance from instructors) to consolidate learning of concepts and techniques. The course will provide a strong foundation for the use of fMRI in research projects in cognitive neuroscience.

Limit: 20

Class: One three-hour class (lecture/seminar/laboratory) per week.

Coursework: 60%

Final Exam: 40%

Other teachers contributing to the course: Dr Reece Roberts

Textbook: Huettel, S.A., Song, A.W., and McCarthy, G.M. (2014) Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (3rd ed.). Sunderland, MA: Sinauer Associates

Recommended courses to take prior to PSYCH 727: PSYCH 202 and PSYCH 305.

Note: PSYCH 305 is recommended but is not a prerequisite. However, background in cognitive neuroscience is assumed and students who have not taken PSYCH 305 are strongly advised to discuss this with the instructors before enrolling in the course.

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PSYCH 730: Professional Psychology Practice In New Zealand


(15 Points), S1

Staff: Dr Margaret Dudley

This course aims to equip students with knowledge and skills required for registration as a psychologist with the New Zealand Psychologists Board. Topics include the structure and functions of the Psychologists Board and Health and Disability Commissioner, cultural competency and professional ethics, and related legislation. Cultural competency includes consideration of obligations for practice that arise from the Treaty of Waitangi and skills for safe practice when working with members of another culture. Professional ethics includes consideration of the Code of Ethics for Psychologists Working in Aotearoa/New Zealand and the practice of ethical decision making. Additional topics include the management of stress and wellbeing, and the ethics and conduct of supervision.

Only for students enrolled in the PGDipAppPsych.

There is a limit of 10 places in this course

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PSYCH 731: Social Psychology and Intergroup Processes


(15 points), S2

Staff: Professor Chris Sibley

The course is seminar-based and focuses on specific social psychological theories relating to intergroup relations, political ideology, and prejudice. The theories covered in this course all relate to trying to understand and model how people operate in social groups, and how it is that almost all human groups tend to be hierarchically structured in a way that leads to some people having more than others. Specific topics covered include research on the causes and expression of sexist and racist beliefs, and the personality and situational factors underlying prejudice and discrimination more generally. The course also has a specific New Zealand focus and integrates research and theory on the psychology of intergroup relations to understand group processes, ideology, and attitudes in New Zealand’s unique socio-political context.

Coursework: This course is internally assessed. 5% class participation and discussion; 10% short essay response 1; 10% Short essay response 2; 25% Seminar presentation; 50% Research proposal.

There is a limit of 16 places in this course.

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PSYCH 740: Sensory Science


(15 points), S1

Staff: Associate Professor Michael Hautus

A range of methods commonly used to measure sensory capacity will be explored, with an emphasis on the difference between methods commonly used by practitioners and scientists and how these methods can be improved. Appropriate methods for use in psychological science (including psychophysics and sensory neuroscience) as well as in industry (product development and consumer testing) will be explored. The application of these methods to the improvement of diagnostic systems and organisational process control may also be covered.

Coursework: 50% TBA
Exam: 50%

There is a limit of 18 places in this course.

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PSYCH 742: The Neuroscience of Awareness


(15 points), S1

Staff: Associate Professor Paul Corballis

This is an advanced seminar in the cognitive neuroscience of perception and attention. Topics may include: capacity limits in perceptual systems and their implications, the neural underpinnings of visual awareness, selective attention, competitive interactions in perceptual systems, perceptual learning and plasticity, and multimodal interactions in perception and attention. The course will foster the understanding of advanced methods in human cognitive neuroscience, including EEG, ERP, structural and functional neuroimaging, and brain stimulation.

Suggested background.  PSYCH 305 or consent of instructor

Coursework: 60%
Final Exam: 40%

There is a limit of 16 places in this course.

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PSYCH 743: Critical Qualitative Research


(15 points), S1

Staff: Associate Professor Virginia Braun

Critical qualitative approaches offer a radical departure from standard psychological methodology, and provide new and multiple ways of thinking about: psychology; doing psychological research; the subject of, and participants in, our research; and ourselves as researchers. This seminar-based course is designed to provide a working experience of such theories and practices. Content of the course will include in-depth discussion around key theoretical underpinnings of critical qualitative research – such as poststructuralist theory, discursive psychology, critical psychology and around contemporary issues and debates in qualitative research. As well as theoretical underpinnings, students will engage with the practicalities of what doing such research involves.

No textbook, readings provided.

Coursework: 100% (essay 25% research report 35% reflective journal assignment 40%)

There is a limit of 16 places in this course.

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PSYCH 744: Experimental Design and Quantitative Methods for Psychology


(15 points), S1

Staff: Associate-Professor Karen Waldie

This course is concerned with the design, analysis and interpretation of psychological experiments. It will focus on quantitative methods (examining relationships among variables and hypothesis testing) and aims to provide students with practical and conceptual understanding of univariate and multivariate statistics. It is expected that students will be familiar with basic techniques (as in Psych 306). Analyses related to the General Linear Model (univariate and multivariate analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, repeated measures) will be covered, including split plot designs and post-hoc analyses. Regression techniques (linear, multiple, logistic) will be covered as well as analyses used for data reduction and classification.

Coursework: 100%

Prerequisite: PSYCH 306 or school consent

There is a limit of 30 places in this course.

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PSYCH 733 Critical Health Psychology


(15 points) S2

Staff: Virginia Braun

 

What is health? Where does it start? Where does it end? What is its opposite? What affects how we understand and/or experience it? Utilising the frameworks of critical psychology, including gendered, indigenous and intersectional frameworks, this course examines ways we can theorise, understand, and promote health for individuals, communities and societies.

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PSYCH 746: Perception, Cognition and Action


(15 points), S2

Staff: Dr Barry Hughes

This is a seminar-based introduction to contemporary theoretical accounts of perceptual-motor integration, control and learning. It will focus on theories of perception and cognition as they apply to the control of action, as well as consider the theoretical implications of diverse real-world perception-action couplings, such as are involved in navigation, manual skills, driving, and sports.

Restriction: PSYCH 735
Coursework: 50%: One research essay 20% oral presentations 15% seminar contributions 15%
Exam: 50%

There is a limit of 18 places in this course.

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PSYCH 750 A & B: Applied Behaviour Analysis: Methods


(30 points), S1 & 2

Staff: Dr Javier Virues-Ortega  (Coordinator)

To complete this course students must enrol in PSYCH 750 A and B

A study of the principles and issues involved with the observation, measurement, and functional analysis of individuals behaviour in applied settings. Particular emphasis will be placed on the rationale behind single-subject research designs and their application to the validation of interventions aimed at modifying behaviour. Familiarity with basic principles of learning and behaviour will be assumed.

It is recommended that students take both PSYCH 750 and PSYCH 751 together (except in exceptional circumstances) as they are linked parts of the comprehensive ABA programme).

Coursework: 50%
Exam: 50%

There is a limit of 16 places in this course.

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PSYCH 751 A & B: Applied Behaviour Analysis: Behaviour Modification


 (30 points), S1 & 2

To complete this course students must enrol in PSYCH 751 A and B

Staff: Dr Angela Arnold-Saritepe

A study of the techniques and issues involved with modifying individual’s behaviour in applied settings. Appropriate and effective applications of scientific principles of learning will be taught, as will relevant topics from the Experimental Analysis of Behaviour. Topics will include the application of research into associative learning, reinforcement, punishment, extinction, avoidance, stimulus control, and choice. Familiarity with basic principles of learning and behaviour will be assumed.

It is recommended that students take both PSYCH 750 and PSYCH 751 together (except in exceptional circumstances) these courses are linked parts of the comprehensive ABA programme).

Coursework: 50% (Details to be advised)
Exam: 50%

There is a limit of 16 places in this course.

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PSYCH 754: Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities


(15 points), S1

Staff: Dr Javier Virues-Ortega

Study of the behavioural aspects, etiologies and therapeutic interventions for disorders usually diagnosed during childhood that are associated with reduced abilities to learn. Examples include intellectual disabilities (mental retardation) and pervasive developmental disorders (e.g. autism).

Restriction: PSYCH 722, PSYCH 752
Coursework: 50%
Exam: 50%

There is a limit of 16 places in this course.

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PSYCH 755: Gender, Power and Sexuality


(15 points), S2

Staff: Professor Nicola Gavey

This seminar-based course will allow students to explore a broad range of topics such as: sexual coercion, prostitution, rape, pornography, safer sex, lesbian and gay sexuality, heterosexuality, bisexuality, sexology, sex therapy, intersex, transgender, sexuality and culture. The emphasis will be on looking at questions from the perspective of theoretical approaches such as Foucault’s work on sexuality and feminist theories.

Coursework: 60%: Assignment 20%, essay 30%, seminar related to essay 10%
Exam: 40%

There is a limit of 14 places in this course.

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PSYCH 757: Advanced Applied Behaviour Analysis


(15 points), S2

Staff: Dr Angela Arnold-Saritepe

Advanced education and training in applied behaviour analysis (ABA) in preparation for a professional career. Topics include ethical, professional, and practical issues confronting behaviour analysts in employment; recent research in ABA and other sciences with respect to clinical, educational, and other populations with whom behaviour analysts typically work.

Prerequisites: PSYCH 750 and PSYCH 751.
Restriction: PSYCH 753.
Co-requisite: PSYCH 651.

This course is limited to PGDipAppPsych (Applied Diploma) students in ABA.

There is a limit of 6 places in this course.

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PSYCH 788 A & B: Honours Dissertation in Psychology


(45 points)

Staff: Dr Danny Osborne

The dissertation for PSYCH 788 is based on a research project supervised by a staff member. Honours Dissertation students are also expected to participate in a Seminar Series. This series is designed to give Honours students exposure to writing and presenting research findings in an open forum and an opportunity to interact with fellow students, your supervisors, and other staff on an informal basis during the academic year.

The series comprises about eight sessions scheduled on a Wednesday afternoons: 3-5pm intermittently during Semester 1 and 2.  Most of these sessions are held in Room 604, level 6, HSB and are convened by Dr Danny Osborne. Further details on the assessment structure for the dissertation will be provided later in the year.

Prerequisite: To complete this course students must enrol in PSYCH 788 A and B.
Deadline for submission: Honours dissertations should be submitted to the Psychology Reception where they will be date stamped in October.

Due dates will be advised for students accepted into the Honours Programme.

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PSYCH 796 A & B: Masters Thesis in Psychology


(120 points)

Staff: Dr Shiloh Groot

To complete this course students must enrol in PSYCH 796 A and B.

Students who wish to take the Masters Degree need to consider the following options to lead towards this degree.

  1. Enrol in either Postgraduate Diploma in Arts or Postgraduate Diploma in Science, with a view to proceeding to Masters (by thesis only).
  2. Apply for the Honours programme, with a view to proceeding in the following year either to Masters by thesis only or (if grades permit) to PhD.

Masters thesis supervision
The idea for a thesis does not have to emanate solely from the student; more often, it will arise out of interaction with members of staff. Generally the main supervisor is a Psychology staff member at The University of Auckland. However, sometimes it is possible to arrange a supervisor in another Department, but in such cases there must also be a co-supervisor from the School of Psychology. When asking staff to supervise them, students should realise that it is not reasonable to expect staff to supervise topics in areas where those staff have no expertise or interest. A resource catalogue of staff interests, expertise and resources can be found at the beginning of the handbook.

Masters by thesis only
Where a student has completed the equivalent of the first year of a masters degree (eg, at another university or in the form of an honours degree, postgraduate diploma or other equivalent qualification) it may be possible to enrol in a masters by thesis only. Please see the Faculty of Arts or Science Student Centres or The University of Auckland Calendar for specific entry requirements. Students who wish to apply for this course of study must consult with the School’s PG Adviser in advance, and will have to have an agreed supervisor.

An supplementary application form is available from the school. It is advisable to contact staff well in advance about possible supervision.

Students must also meet the minimum faculty entry requirement for this programme of study

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Further information


For more information or general enquiries please contact:

Academic Advisers

Michelle Burstall
Andrea Mead

Advisor of Honours and Postgraduate Diploma

Dr Danny Osborne

Advisor for Masters Thesis Programme

Dr Shiloh Groot

 

 

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