School of Psychology - Leading psychological science, scholarship and practice


Participate in our research

Since human psychology is the focus of most of our research projects, human participants are vital to our research. We invite you to discover the range of research being conducted and to consider volunteering to participate in one or more of these projects.

Staff, post-doctoral researchers and postgraduate students in Psychology are active in a wide variety of research projects. Since human psychology is the focus of most of these projects, human participants are vital to our research. We invite you to discover the range of research being conducted and to consider volunteering to participate in one or more of these projects.

The research not only advances our understanding of how minds work but also offers participants unique, first-hand experience of research methods and techniques.

Below is a list of current research projects seeking human participants. Contact the researchers directly if you would like more information. Note that projects vary in their focus, in the time commitments involved, and in the characteristics of the participants sought.

The research studies listed on the school website may not be eligible for course credits as per the participant pool.

 

  1. » Personality and emotional responsiveness: A pupillometry study
  2. » Infant and Child studies in the Early Learning Lab (ELLA).
  3. » Emotion regulation in families.
  4. » Face perception and face recognition.
  5. » Factors affecting recovery from mTBI or concussion.
  6. » EEG Indices of the competition between memory and attention.
  7. » Language maintenance and attitudes of the 1.5 generation Korean and Chinese New Zealanders.
  8. » #Queer #HIV: The Personal Pedagogies Of Queer Young Men in Āotearoa New Zealand in the Online Age.
  9. » Juiced-up synaptic plasticity and cognition
  10. » Volunteers needed for fMRI study on memory and imagination
  11. » Volunteers needed for a behavioural study on memory and imagination
  12. » Emotion recognition in aging
  13. » Recognition of Expression
  14. » The electrophysiology of expression production and recognition: An EMG and ERP investigation
  15. » Speech Science study on voice perception
  16. » Spread of object-based attention
  17. » Emotional Responses to Pictures: A Pupillometry Study
  18. » Neural processes and neural pathways for visual attention and visual perception
  19. » Women’s experiences of long-term antidepressant use
  20. » Men’s Emotional Cultures: A Sexuality-Based Comparison of Young Urban New Zealand Men
  21. » Fractal Analysis of Autism Spectrum Disorder
  22. » Personality and Emotional Responsiveness: A Pupillometry Study
  23. » Information Processing and Blood Pressure Study
  24. » Participants needed for investigation of new depression treatment
  25. » Teaching Symbols Using Different Rewards
  26. » The Roots of Resilience
  27. » Visual cognition without awareness
  28. » Capturing attention

Personality and emotional responsiveness: A pupillometry study


I am looking for volunteers to participate in research that aims to investigate the relationship between certain personality traits (empathy) and a non-conscious measure of emotional responsiveness (pupil activity).

The experiment involves the completion of two short questionnaires, and viewing a series of emotionally arousing pictures while seated in front of an eye-tracker. The experiment will last approximately 20 minutes, and all participants will be reimbursed with a $10 supermarket voucher.

For more information or to express interest in participating, please contact Kelsey Schaumann at ksch455@aucklanduni.ac.nz

Infant and Child studies in the Early Learning Lab (ELLA).


If you, or someone you know, has a child under 7 years of age, or is expecting a new child we'd love your help! ELLA is interested in what children (0 to 7 years of age) understand about people and objects in the world around them and how this understanding influences their learning. ELLA runs several studies at any particular time, so when your child is the correct age for participation in one of our studies, we will contact you to make an appointment to come into ELLA. Our studies generally involve one visit lasting one hour – although most of our studies only require 20-30 minutes of your child’s attention. Free parking and small gifts for the children are provided. To find out more visit our website www.earlylearning.ac.nz or feel free to contact us directly at earlylearning.nz@gmail.com or phone (09) 923 4236.

Emotion regulation in families.


The Early Learning Lab is currently looking for parents and their children (aged between 4.5 - 5.5 years) who are living together to participate in a study on emotion regulation!

The aim of the current research is to examine the different ways adults and children regulate their emotions and which strategies might be more effective than others. Families involved will receive a total of $100 in vouchers (Westfield or petrol) at the end of the study as reimbursement for their time and effort. Your child will also receive a toy at the end of the study. Participation involve 1) Completing an online questionnaire which will take 30-40 minutes and 2) Coming in to the University to engage in a recorded discussion with your partner about your relationship while your child takes part in a series of activities to help us learn how children deal with challenges. For further details, please email Rachel earlylearning.nz@gmail.com; (09) 923 4236.

Please read below to ensure you are eligible to participate in this study:

 - Have a child aged between 4.5 - 5.5 years old (54 - 66 months)

 - Your child must be living with you and your current partner

 - Have lived with your partner for at least 1 year

 - Speak fluent English

The project has been approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee Ref: 012621

Face perception and face recognition.


A project on how people perceive and process faces. Participation will involve a session of no more than 60 min, for which a $10 voucher is offered, and will require matching or remembering faces in different conditions.  There is no discomfort involved.  For further details, contact Haiyang Jin hjin317@aucklanduni.ac.nz.

The project has been approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee Ref 016078.

 

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Factors affecting recovery from mTBI or concussion.


A neuroimaging/neuropsychological study is looking at how people recover following a mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) or concussion. Most people recover well, but it is estimated that as many as 10-20% of people following mTBI may go on to experience persistent post-concussion symptoms.

People aged 18-64 who have suffered a mTBI within the last 3-6 months and have had a formal diagnosis of such an injury from a health/medical professional are invited. We are interested in hearing from individuals who have recovered well or who may still be experiencing post- concussion symptoms 3-6 months following injury, as well as control participants (i.e., people who have not had a recent mTBI). Volunteers will need to attend a brain imaging session (45 minutes) at the Centre for Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging at the University’s Grafton Campus and undertake a cognitive assessment (110 minutes).

All participants will be provided with a full participant information sheet and an opportunity to ask questions before a written informed consent is obtained. Participants will be compensated with a $20 Westfield voucher for their time. For more information on participating in the study, contact: Dr Gjurgjica Badzakova, phone 3737599 ext. 82140, 021 1555 951 or email g.badzakova@auckland.ac.nz.

This project has been approved by the Health and Disability Ethics Committee Ref: 13/STH/177

 

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EEG Indices of the competition between memory and attention.


I'm looking for volunteers who are willing to perform a simple visual search task while holding objects in their short term memory. During these tasks the activity of your brain will be recorded using electroencephalography (EEG). Therefore electrodes will be placed on your head by means of an elastic cap. Testing will take approximately 2 hours of your time and you will be compensated with a $10 Westfield voucher. To be eligible you must be aged between 18-35 years and have no history of epilepsy or migraine.

If you wish to participate, or have any questions, please contact Dion Henare email dhen061@aucklanduni.ac.nz; or phone (09) 373 7599 ext 85969.

The project has been approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee Ref 8201.

 

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Language maintenance and attitudes of the 1.5 generation Korean and Chinese New Zealanders.



This project investigates the language attitudes and language maintenance of Korean and Chinese migrants who arrived in new Zealand as children. We are seeking students who are of Korean or Chinese ethnicity, arrived in NZ as children and have been through the NZ education system. Participation will involve a single interview  of no more than 60 minutes where you will be asked for your experiences of growing up in NZ and your attitudes towards the languages that you speak. To compensate you for your time you will receive a $20 gift voucher.

For further details, contact Dr Elaine Ballard e.ballard@auckland.ac.nz; phone (09) 373 7599 ext 87502. 

This project has been approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee Ref 015812.

 

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#Queer #HIV: The Personal Pedagogies Of Queer Young Men in Āotearoa New Zealand in the Online Age.


We are seeking same-sex attracted, gay-, bisexual-, takatāpui- or queer-identified males (trans guys welcome) aged 16-29, who are living in Auckland, to take part in a study examining how young queer men in New Zealand seek, find, understand and make meaning about themselves in the context elevated HIV vulnerability.

A better understanding of both online and face-to-face aspects of these men’s lives will allow for more targeted and purposeful support and health promotion campaigns to minimise HIV transmission.

For further details contact the principal investigator, Dr. John P Egan j.egan@auckland.ac.nz

This project has been approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee 02 July 2015, Reference Number 014912

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Juiced-up synaptic plasticity and cognition


We are looking for 23 to 65 year-old participants for an electroencephalography (EEG) study of a drink that may improve brain function. Participation will involve daily consumption of the drink over 2 periods of 5 weeks, and 4 EEG sessions. EEG sessions last about 2 hours (comprising setup, the experiment, and wrap-up), and will require looking at and responding to images on a computer screen. Vouchers are offered for each pair of EEG sessions. There are no known side effects or risks associated with EEG. For more information please contact Rohan King r.king@auckland.ac.nz;  phone (09) 373 7599 ext 88421.

Approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee (Ref 013988).

 

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Volunteers needed for fMRI study on memory and imagination


Professor Donna Rose Addis, Dr Reece Roberts, and Kristina Wiebels are investigating how we remember the past and imagine the future. In this study, you will think about future events during an fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging) scan to measure your brain activity. You will also be asked to complete some simple control tasks.

This study involves 2 sessions, about one week apart. Each session will be about 2 hours long; session 1 will take place in the Science Centre (city campus), session 2 in Auckland Medical School (FMHS). You will be compensated with a $25 gift certificate for each session completed. You will also get a 3D picture of your brain.

To be eligible you must be fluent in English, right handed, aged between 18 and 35 years, have never taken anti-depressant medications, and you must not have a history of head injury or neurological conditions.

For more information contact Kristina: mri.memorylab@gmail.com or send a text to 021 028 49941.

This project has been approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee (Ref 2012/7796).

 

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Volunteers needed for a behavioural study on memory and imagination


Professor Donna Rose Addis, Dr Reece Roberts, and Kristina Wiebels are investigating how we remember the past and imagine the future. In this study, you will think about future events, and will complete some simple control tasks.

This study involves 2 behavioural sessions, each 1-2 hours long, and takes place in the Science Centre (city campus). You will be compensated with a $25 gift certificate for each session completed.

To be eligible you must be fluent in English, aged between 18 and 35 years, have never taken anti-depressant medications, and must not have a history of head injury or neurological conditions.

For more information contact Kristina: behavioural.memorylab@gmail.com or send a text to 021 028 49941.

This project has been approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee (Ref 2012/7796).

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Emotion recognition in aging


We are seeking volunteers for a project investigating how our ability to process emotions changes with age. This study involves 2 sessions (each 2 hours) and some questionnaires to fill out at home. One session involves an MRI scan. Your time will be compensated with a $50 voucher, and you can receive a picture of your brain scan.

To be eligible to participate, you must be aged 18-35 OR 65-80 years, and have no history of head injury or neurological conditions.

If you are interested in participating, please contact Laura Ewens (memorylab.auckland@gmail.com, phone: 09 373 7599 ex 83072 or mobile: 022 677 2855).

This project has been approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee (Ref 2015/016024).

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Recognition of Expression


We will record the electrical activity of your brain using EEG while you perform an emotion-recognition task.  You will watch a series of images containing a range of expressions of emotion.  Your task will be to identify the expressions displayed. You will also be requested to finish a questionnaire to report how “real” you think the images are. $20 voucher will be given to thank you for your participation.

For further details, contact Jingwen Mao (jmao353@aucklanduni.ac.nz).

This project has been approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee (ref. 010593) from April 08 2014 until April 08 2017.

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The electrophysiology of expression production and recognition: An EMG and ERP investigation


The objective of the project is to investigate the recognition of expressions of emotion. The project involves the use of electroencephalography (EEG) to monitor the activity of your brain (EEG) while you do a simple task on the computer. EEG involves placing electrodes on the surface of your scalp by means of an elastic ‘cap’. The electrodes are encased in sponges, which are soaked in an electrolyte solution (consisting of baby shampoo, salt, and water).

Participation will involve a single session of about 90 minutes (30 minutes to set up and up to 60 mins for the task – this includes short breaks). Your participation will help us to gain a better understanding of human emotional expression processing and you will be offered a $20 voucher. 

For further details, contact Sreekari Vogeti (svog576@aucklanduni.ac.nz). 

This project has been approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee (Ref 010593).

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Speech Science study on voice perception


You are invited to participate in a research project being conducted in the School of Psychology, exploring whether and how listeners perceive the age of an unknown and unseen speaker, and whether this perception changes between listeners with varying knowledge and training on the voice (e.g. linguistics students, speech-language therapy students).

The study will involve an anonymous online ‘survey’ which will take about 20 minutes. Those who choose to participate will answer a few demographic questions (e.g. age, gender, ethnicity, knowledge and experience relating to voice use), and then listen to short recordings of speakers and judge their age.

If you would like to participate, please follow the following link to the survey: 

https://auckland.au1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_ahN6jMen1VPR9BP

If you have any questions or concerns about this study, please contact Dhanya Herath (dher191@aucklanduni.ac.nz) or her supervisors (Clare McCann in Speech Science c.mccann@auckland.ac.nz or Catherine Watson in Electrical and Computer Engineering c.watson@auckland.ac.nz).

Approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee on 13 June 2016 for three years. Reference number: 017035.

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Spread of object-based attention


A small and fairly simple project investigating how visual attention spreads along the boundaries of objects in a way (theorised to be) not unlike the flow of water through cracks in a sidewalk. Participation will involve a short 30 min session where participants respond to a very fast succession of visual prompts on a computer screen. Participants will be compensated with $10 dollars for their time, in addition to the option of having a lovely chat about brains and cognitive science with the researcher (Tasi). There is no discomfort involved, although the experiment does play like a simple but intense video-game. The data will help us to understand mechanisms of vision and how it relates to neighbouring receptive fields in the visual system.

For further details, email Tasi Watson (pwat053@aucklanduni.ac.nz).

This project has been approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee (Ref 2016/017271)

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Emotional Responses to Pictures: A Pupillometry Study


We are looking for volunteers to participate in research that aims to provide insight into emotional responsiveness to pictures. In this study, emotional responsiveness will be gauged by measuring changes in the size of the eye pupils, as participants view a series of pictures.  The pictures used in the study have been selected to be emotionally arousing, and include images of naked men and women, images of babies, images of landscapes, images of everyday objects, and images of bodily injuries.  During the experiment, participants will view a series of pictures drawn from these categories, whilst seated in front of an eye-tracker. The experiment will last approximately 15-20 minutes, and all participants will receive a $10 gift voucher in compensation.

Volunteers for this study might also be interested in volunteering for a related study, which is being carried out at the same time, in the same location.  Our second study involves measuring response times to peripheral visual objects - see advertisement entitled Neural processes and neural pathways for visual attention and visual perception’.

For further details, please contact Tony Lambert (a.lambert@auckland.ac.nz or  021 161 2980).

Approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee on 02 MAY 2016 for three years, Reference Number 017214.

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Neural processes and neural pathways for visual attention and visual perception


Shifting one’s attention from object to object and location to location is absolutely crucial for purposeful navigation of our complex environments.  In the present project we are interested in examining some of the factors thought to influence rapid attentional orienting to items positioned in the periphery of our vision, and we intend to do this by comparing responses made by the eyes with responses made by the fingers.  Involvement in our study will require approximately an hour of your time, and for this you will be given a $20 Westfield voucher as a token of our gratitude for your help.  The procedure itself will require no more of you than to view a series of simple visual stimuli and make similarly simple responses to them, both by moving your eyes and by pressing certain keys on a keyboard.  If interested in assisting us, please send an email letting us know what day/time you'd be available to help.

For further details please contact Sam Askelund:  sask007@aucklanduni.ac.nz

This project has been approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee on 26th September 20125 FOR 3 YEARS (Until 26th September 2018). Reference Number 7835.        

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Women’s experiences of long-term antidepressant use


This study aims to understand the experiences of benefits and challenges  of using antidepressants long term for the treatment of depression, and how these experiences change or develop over time. If you are between the ages of 25-65 and have taken antidepressants continuously for  five years or more you are eligible to take part in this study. Participation will involve taking part in a face to face interview. If you wish to consider taking part in this study and would like more information please contact Ondria Cowan (researcher) at ocow001@aucklanduni.ac.nz

Approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee on: 01/03/16 for three years, Reference Number: 016163.

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Men’s Emotional Cultures: A Sexuality-Based Comparison of Young Urban New Zealand Men


This study looks at the relationship between men’s ideas around masculinity, their sexual orientation and how it relates to their understanding and expression of emotions – what are referred to as ‘emotional cultures’. There is a strong sentiment in this country that Kiwi men lack emotional intelligence and struggle to express emotions, and I want to know how you feel about this. The study involves a one-on-one interview on this topic which will last around an hour. The interview will be recorded and later transcribed by the researcher. I am looking for men aged 18 to 30 who are New Zealand citizens and identify as either straight or gay to participate in the study. For further details, please contact me on atan113@aucklanduni.ac.nz

This project has been approved by the University Of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee on 17/05/2016 for three years (reference number: 017260).

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Fractal Analysis of Autism Spectrum Disorder


Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD’s) are difficult to diagnose accurately. New methods to analyse the complexity of information contained within brain signals and genetics may provide an answer. Participants will anonymously take a brief questionnaire, provide a cheek swab and have a non-invasive brain scan (Electro-Encephalograph - EEG) while performing two different computer tasks, all of which will takes about two hours. There could be some minimal discomfort involved in putting on the EEG apparatus (lightweight head-net with tiny electrodes soaked in saline solution). The data will provide a basis for developing a biomarker based taxonomy for diagnosing ASD. For further details contact Stephen Wolfson (s.wolfson@auckland.ac.nz ext 88421).

This project has been approved by the University of Auckland Human Participation Ethics Committee (Ref 016911).

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Personality and Emotional Responsiveness: A Pupillometry Study


I am looking for volunteers to participate in research that aims to provide insight into whether there is a relationship between personality traits and a non-conscious measure of emotional responsiveness. The experiment is composed of completing 4 questionnaires, followed by viewing a series of pictures whilst seated in front of an eye-tracker. The experiment will last approximately 45 minutes, and all participants will receive a $20 Westfield voucher in compensation. For further details, please contact Sophia Dawson (sdaw519@aucklanduni.ac.nz).

This project has been approved by the University of Auckland Human Ethics Committee (Ref 017214)

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Information Processing and Blood Pressure Study


A project on the relationship between blood flow and brain activation patterns while processing information. 

It is important that all participants in this study do not participate in regular physical activities or exercise, and have not done so for at least several months. Participation is on campus at The University of Auckland in the Human Science building, and the study takes place in the morning on Weekdays and Sundays, taking approximately 2 hours. Participants will have their blood pressure taken, and they will also complete a computer task while under EEG. There is no discomfort involved. Participants are compensated with a $20 Countdown Voucher as a thank you for their time.  If you are interested in participating or getting more information, please email Nicole (ntay478@aucklanduni.ac.nz). 

This project has been approved by University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee (17243, 2016).

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Participants needed for investigation of new depression treatment


We are looking for individuals with treatment-resistant depression to participate in an investigation of a new depression treatment. You may qualify for the study if you are 18-45 years of age and have found that two or more types of antidepressants haven’t worked for you. The study involves one screening visit and two study day visits to the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences. The study day visits will involve blood samples, and neuropsychological, MRI, and EEG tests. All participants will receive a single dose of a new treatment for depression.

For more information please contact our study team (deptrial@auckland.ac.nz).  

This study has received ethical approval from Northern B Health and Disability Ethics Committee Ref No.15/NTB/53

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Teaching Symbols Using Different Rewards


This study explores different methods for teaching people to classify information, symbols, and stimuli.  We are recruiting adults between 18 and 40 years to take part in 3-4 1 hours sessions.  Participants will be taught to classify different stimuli using a computer programme featuring different rewards. Participant will be reimbursed up to $20 in petrol vouchers.  The present study compares two different reward methods, and looks at difficulty as a moderator of their effectiveness.  This study will help us learn more about how rewards can be used in learning, and develop effective teaching procedures for individuals with intellectual disabilities and autism.

For further information please contact Jessica McCormack (jmcc146@aucklanduni.ac.nz)

This project has been approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee (Ref 018548).

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The Roots of Resilience


A new research project is looking for Kiwis to fill out an anonymous online survey on negative childhood experiences, resilience and current well-being. Participants should be aged 18 to 35, and have spent the majority of their life before 18 growing up in New Zealand.

Participation will involve a 15 minute online questionnaire which is completely anonymous. After your data has been submitted to protect your anonymity, you can choose to go in the draw to win one of 10 $100 Countdown vouchers. For further details contact Jessie Mee (jmee005@aucklanduni.ac.nz). You can read more about the project at: www.facebook.com/therootsofresilience/ or go directly to the survey here: www.tinyurl.com/therootsofresilience

Approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee on 10th January 2017 for three years, Reference Number 018403.

 

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Visual cognition without awareness


Our research investigates the extent of visual perception and cognition when items are difficult to see. You will be asked to discriminate or respond to computer-displayed stimuli. Your participation will help us to understand how humans process visible and non-visible things in the environment. Experiments generally take about one hour with frequent opportunities to rest, and you can receive a $10 or $20 voucher.

For further details, contact Matt Oxner (moxn128@aucklanduni.ac.nz).

The project has been approved by University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee (Ref 013154).

Capturing attention


Shifting one’s attention from object to object and location to location is absolutely crucial for purposeful navigation of our complex environments. In the present project, Dr Nathan Ryckman and Associate Professor Tony Lambert are interested in examining factors thought to influence rapid attentional orienting to items positioned in the periphery of our vision, and we intend to do this by comparing responses made by the eyes with responses made by the fingers. Involvement in our study will require approximately one hour and not more than two hours, and for this you will be given a $20 voucher as a token of our gratitude for your help. The procedure itself will require no more of you than to view a series of simple visual stimuli and make similarly simple responses to them, both by moving your eyes and by pressing certain keys on a keyboard. If interested in assisting us, please send an email letting us know what day and time you would be available to help.

For further details please contact Dr Nathan Ryckman n.ryckman@auckland.ac.nz

This project has been approved by the University of Auckland Human Participants Ethics Committee on 26 September 2015 for three years (until 26 September 2018). Reference Number 7835.      ​