Danny Osborne

Ph.D., Social Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles (June, 2011)

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Senior Lecturer

Biography

Danny Osborne is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Psychology at the University of Auckland. Danny received his PhD from UCLA in 2011, where he studied social psychology with an emphasis in political psychology and quantitative methods. Danny's research seeks to understand the causes and consequences of inequality, with a particular emphasis on ideology and collective action. Additional information on Danny’s research and teaching can be found below.

Research | Current

My research is broadly situated in the overlap between political psychology and intergroup relations (an area of social psychology that aims to understand why groups often fail to get along). Specifically, I have two separate lines of research that jointly examine the ways in which inequality and social injustices are reproduced in society:

One of my lines of research examines the causes and consequences of inequality, with a particular focus on system justification theory, relative deprivation, and collective action: 

  • What are the factors that motivate collective action on behalf of the poor?
  • Why do people accept, and sometimes actively support, belief systems that reinforce the status quo (often at the expense of their individual- and group-based interests)?
  • How do aspects of the social environment influence people’s decision to participate (vs. withhold their participation) in collective action?

My other line of research investigates the influence that different belief systems have on legitimizing social injustices. Within this overarching theme, I am interested in the following questions:

  • How do beliefs about gender roles shape people’s support for women’s rights?
  • What types of attributions do people make to justify their beliefs about economic inequality?
  • Which personality traits from the Big Five correlate with support for various political beliefs?

As a member of the New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study (NZAVS) Central Management Team, I use large-scale surveys and longitudinal data to model the associations between socio-political beliefs and key social justice outcomes in order to answer these (and other) important questions. Ultimately, both of my lines of research focus on understanding how inequality is manufactured and reproduced in society. I believe that we must first understand how social injustices operate before we can effectively eliminate them.

 

Google Scholar Profile

Teaching | Current

Danny teaches two undergraduate courses in social psychology (namely, PSYCH 204 and PSYCH 311) and a postgraduate course in political psychology (PSYCH 700). He also currently coordinates the Honours programme in the School of Psychology, as well as two individual studies courses (namely, PSYCH 306 and PSYCH 720). Links to these courses can be found below:

 

Undergraduate Teaching

PSYCH 204: Social Psychology

PSYCH 311: Advanced Topics in Social Psychology

 

Postgraduate Teaching

PSYCH 700: Political Psychology

 

Read more about the Social Psychology Postgraduate Programme

Distinctions/Honours

  • Faculty Research Development Fund (2011-2013)
  • Joseph A. Gengerelli Distinguished Dissertation Award (Finalist)   
  • Social Psychology Dissertation Award (Finalist)      
  • Dissertation Year Fellowship (2010-2011)
  • Graduate Student Poster Award, Society for Personality and Social Psychology (2010)
  • Bertram H. Raven Award for Best Graduate Student Paper on Social Issues (2009)
  • CSU Chancellor’s Mini-Grant (2009)
  • Grant-in-Aid, Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (2009)

Areas of expertise

Social psychology, political psychology, inequality, sexism, racism, inequality, collective action, personality (the Big Five), longitudinal modelling, multilevel modelling, measurement invariance

Committees/Professional groups/Services

  • International Society of Political Psychology (ISPP)
  • Society of Australasian Social Psychologists (SASP)
  • Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP)
  • Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI)

Selected publications and creative works (Research Outputs)

  • Huang, Y., Davies, P. G., Sibley, C. G., & Osborne, D. (2016). Benevolent sexism, attitudes toward motherhood, and reproductive rights: A multi-study longitudinal examination of abortion attitudes. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 42 (7), 970-984. 10.1177/0146167216649607
    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2292/31536
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Chris Sibley, Yanshu Huang
  • Sibley, C. G., & Osborne, D. (2016). Ideology and post-colonial society. Political Psychology, 37 (S1), 115-161. 10.1111/pops.12323
    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2292/31541
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Chris Sibley
  • Osborne, D., Yogeeswaran, K., & Sibley, C. G. (2015). Hidden consequences of political efficacy: Testing an efficacy-apathy model of political mobilization. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 21 (4), 533-540. 10.1037/cdp0000029
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Chris Sibley
  • Osborne, D., Sibley, C. G., Huo, Y. J., & Smith, H. (2015). Doubling-down on deprivation: Using latent profile analysis to evaluate an age-old assumption in relative deprivation theory. European Journal of Social Psychology, 45 (4), 482-495. 10.1002/ejsp.2099
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Chris Sibley
  • Sengupta, N. K., Osborne, D., & Sibley, C. G. (2015). The status-legitimacy hypothesis revisited: Ethnic-group differences in general and dimension-specific legitimacy. British Journal of Social Psychology, 54 (2), 324-340. 10.1111/bjso.12080
    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2292/26322
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Chris Sibley
  • Osborne, D., Sibley, C. G., & Sengupta, N. K. (2015). Income and neighbourhood-level inequality predict self-esteem and ethnic identity centrality through individual-and group-based relative deprivation: A multilevel path analysis. European Journal of Social Psychology, 45 (3), 368-377. 10.1002/ejsp.2087
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Chris Sibley
  • Osborne, D., & Sibley, C. G. (2015). Opposing Paths to Ideology: Group-Based Relative Deprivation Predicts Conservatism Through Warmth Toward Ingroup and Outgroup Members. Social Justice Research, 28 (1), 27-51. 10.1007/s11211-014-0227-1
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Chris Sibley
  • Osborne, D., Huo, Y. J., & Smith, H. J. (2015). Organizational respect dampens the impact of group-based relative deprivation on willingness to protest pay cuts. Br J Soc Psychol, 54 (1), 159-175. 10.1111/bjso.12069

Contact details

Primary office location

SCIENCE CENTRE 301 - Bldg 301
23 SYMONDS ST
AUCKLAND 1010
New Zealand