Danny Osborne

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Senior Lecturer

Biography

Before joining the School of Psychology as a lecturer in July of 2011, I was a PhD student at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). While at UCLA, I studied social psychology and completed a double minor in political psychology and quantitative methods. Now that I am on the other side of the desk, I teach social psychology and am developing an advanced topic paper on intergroup relations/political psychology for 2012.

Research | Current

My research is broadly situated in the overlap between political psychology and intergroup relations. Specifically, I have two separate lines of research that jointly examine the ways in which inequality and social injustices are reproduced in society:

  1. The first of these lines of research investigates the influence that different belief systems have on legitimizing social injustices. Within this overarching theme, I am interested in the following questions:
    • How do beliefs about gender roles shape people’s support for women’s rights?
    • What types of attributions do people make to justify their beliefs about economic inequality?
    • Why do people accept concessions that ultimately reinforce the status quo?
    • When (and how) do people respond to unfair treatment?
  2. My second line of research takes my focus on intergroup relations and applies it to the criminal justice system. Specifically, I am interested in the different types of stereotypes that people have of criminals. Moreover, I examine the impact that these stereotypes have on people’s memory of a suspect’s physical appearance. In doing so, I draw upon the literatures on stereotype-consistent memory biases, perceived stereotypicality, and mistaken identifications.

In addressing these two themes, I use a multi-method approach that combines the precision of experimentation with the generalizability of surveys. I believe that this is an effective way of balancing the benefits and drawbacks of any one particular method.

Ultimately, both of my lines of research focus on understanding how inequality is manufactured and reproduced in society. I believe that we must first understand how social injustices operate before we can effectively eliminate them.

Read more about the Social Psychology Postgraduate Programme

Distinctions/Honours

  • Faculty Research Development Fund (2011-2013)
  • Joseph A. Gengerelli Distinguished Dissertation Award (Finalist)   
  • Social Psychology Dissertation Award (Finalist)      
  • Dissertation Year Fellowship (2010-2011)
  • Graduate Student Poster Award, Society for Personality and Social Psychology (2010)
  • Bertram H. Raven Award for Best Graduate Student Paper on Social Issues (2009)
  • CSU Chancellor’s Mini-Grant (2009)
  • Grant-in-Aid, Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (2009)

Committees/Professional groups/Services

  • International Society of Political Psychology (ISPP)
  • Society of Australasian Social Psychologists (SASP)
  • Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP)
  • Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI)

Selected publications and creative works (Research Outputs)

  • Huang, Y., Davies, P. G., Sibley, C. G., & Osborne, D. (2016). Benevolent Sexism, Attitudes Toward Motherhood, and Reproductive Rights: A Multi-Study Longitudinal Examination of Abortion Attitudes. Personality & social psychology bulletin, 42 (7), 970-984. 10.1177/0146167216649607
    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2292/31536
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Chris Sibley, Yanshu Huang
  • Sibley, C. G., & Osborne, D. (2016). Ideology and Post-Colonial Society. Political Psychology, 37, 115-161. 10.1111/pops.12323
    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2292/31541
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Chris Sibley
  • Osborne, D., Yogeeswaran, K., & Sibley, C. G. (2015). Hidden consequences of political efficacy: Testing an efficacy-apathy model of political mobilization. Cultural diversity & ethnic minority psychology, 21 (4), 533-540. 10.1037/cdp0000029
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Chris Sibley
  • Osborne, D., Sibley, C. G., Huo, Y. J., & Smith, H. (2015). Doubling-down on deprivation: Using latent profile analysis to evaluate an age-old assumption in relative deprivation theory. European Journal of Social Psychology, 45 (4), 482-495. 10.1002/ejsp.2099
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Chris Sibley
  • Sengupta, N. K., Osborne, D., & Sibley, C. G. (2015). The status-legitimacy hypothesis revisited: Ethnic-group differences in general and dimension-specific legitimacy. The British journal of social psychology, 54 (2), 324-340. 10.1111/bjso.12080
    URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2292/26322
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Chris Sibley
  • Osborne, D., Sibley, C. G., & Sengupta, N. K. (2015). Income and neighbourhood-level inequality predict self-esteem and ethnic identity centrality through individual- and group-based relative deprivation: A multilevel path analysis. European Journal of Social Psychology, 45 (3), 368-377. 10.1002/ejsp.2087
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Chris Sibley
  • Osborne, D., & Sibley, C. G. (2015). Opposing Paths to Ideology: Group-Based Relative Deprivation Predicts Conservatism Through Warmth Toward Ingroup and Outgroup Members. Social Justice Research, 28 (1), 27-51. 10.1007/s11211-014-0227-1
    Other University of Auckland co-authors: Chris Sibley
  • Osborne, D., Huo, Y. J., & Smith, H. J. (2015). Organizational respect dampens the impact of group-based relative deprivation on willingness to protest pay cuts. Br J Soc Psychol, 54 (1), 159-175. 10.1111/bjso.12069

Contact details

Primary location

SCIENCE CENTRE 301 - Bldg 301
Level 2, Room 238B
23 SYMONDS ST
AUCKLAND 1010
New Zealand